Unfsa Agreement

The high-migratory fish is a term that has its origin in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. It concerns fish species that carry out ocean migrations and also have a wide geographical coverage, and generally refers to tuna and tuna species, shark, marlin and swordfish. Inter-territorial fish stocks are particularly vulnerable to overfishing due to inefficient management regimes and non-respect for fisheries interests. United Nations Conference on Straddling Fish Stocks and Highly Migratory Fish Stocks (1993-1995) FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries (1 November 1995) are straddling fish stocks that pass through more than one exclusive economic zone or are in more than one exclusive economic zone. The agreement was adopted in 1995 and entered into force in 2001. [1] The Convention was adopted on 4 Adopted by the United Nations Conference on Straddling Fish Stocks and Highly Migratory Fish Stocks on 4 December 1995 and opened for signature on 4 December 1995. It remained for signature until 4 December 1996 and was signed by 59 States and institutions. The conditions for the entry into force of the Agreement were fulfilled on 11 November 2001, when the Maltese Minister for Foreign Affairs deposited with the Secretary-General an instrument of accession to the Agreement. The instrument was the thirtieth instrument of ratification or accession deposited.

The Convention entered into force on 11 December 2001, thirty days after the deposit of the thirtieth instrument of ratification or accession referred to in Article 40, paragraph 1, of the Convention. The Agreement on Straddling Fish Stocks (the Agreement on the Implementation of the Provisions of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea of 10 December 1982 concerning the Conservation and Management of Straddling Fish Stocks and Highly Migratory Fish Stocks) is a multilateral treaty established by the United Nations to improve the cooperative management of fishery resources in large areas. and are of economic and environmental importance to a number of nations. As of December 2016, the treaty has been ratified by 91 parties, including 90 states and the European Union. [2] The agreement attempts to achieve this objective by creating a framework for cooperation in the conservation and management of these resources. . . .

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